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    The only thing I have ever had within my memory is measles at age 20, 68 years ago.
    I have no knowledge of what vaccines or diseases I may have had as a child.
    I am certain I had certain vaccinations before going overseas while in the Army and no recollection of being vaccinated since for anything, except flu in recent years.
    Last edited by lonewolf; 03-26-2019 at 05:26 AM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by lonewolf View Post
    The only thing I have ever had within my memory is measles at age 20, 68 years ago.
    I have no knowledge of what vaccines or diseases I may have had as a child and no recollection of being vaccinated for anything, except flu in recent years.
    You should talk to your doctor about a pertussis booster! Pertussis outbreaks are cyclical and have been increasing since we switched from the whole cell vaccine to the acellular vaccine, and we will probably have some larger outbreaks in the next few years.

    The current CDC recommendation (last updated 2012) is one Tdap as an adult and then just Td boosters every 10 years after that.

    http://www.todaysgeriatricmedicine.c...x_110413.shtml

    Was your case of measles bad? I have heard that is worse as an adult.
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    Quote Originally Posted by lonewolf View Post
    The only thing I have ever had within my memory is measles at age 20, 68 years ago.
    I have no knowledge of what vaccines or diseases I may have had as a child.
    I am certain I had certain vaccinations before going overseas while in the Army and no recollection of being vaccinated since for anything, except flu in recent years.
    IIRC, our generation childhood's only vaccines available were smallpox and BCG (for TB). BCG was universally administered in Europe, not so in USA. Polio became available in mid-50s, MMR 60s.
    As far as I remember, I had chicken pox, mumps, scarlet fever and probably a very mild case of pertussis. Do not recall having either measles or rubella. It is interesting, since my younger brother had measles when I was in the pre-teens.
    "A beautiful theory killed by an ugly fact."
    by Thomas Henry Huxley
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pego View Post
    IIRC, our generation childhood's only vaccines available were smallpox and BCG (for TB). BCG was universally administered in Europe, not so in USA. Polio became available in mid-50s, MMR 60s.
    As far as I remember, I had chicken pox, mumps, scarlet fever and probably a very mild case of pertussis. Do not recall having either measles or rubella. It is interesting, since my younger brother had measles when I was in the pre-teens.
    I am just young enough to have avoided polio and, in fact, one of my earliest memories is standing in a long line to get the pink syrup (not methadone for you junkies out there). I also recall the adult conversations driven by fear of a recent small outbreak and happiness that there was a preventative.

    I also definitely had chicken pox (have the scars but no shingles yet) and mumps as a child and measles twice, once as a child and once as an adult. I don't recommend any of those diseases except for those parents who don't vaccinate their children.

    I also was one of the last to have a childhood x-ray for TB from a mobile van as they were discontinued shortly afterwards thanks to effective long term whole-of-population treatment.

    Sadly, we might see a comeback of these TB tests in the next few decades as well as more frequent appearances of long preventable diseases because humans are basically dumb as dog shit(on a good day).
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    Quote Originally Posted by polevaultpower View Post
    Was your case of measles bad? I have heard that is worse as an adult.
    I had measles in my mid-20s. The doc seemed surprised--he saw a lot of kids with measles but not many adults.

    It was pretty bad--was in bed for about 4 days, felt weak for almost two weeks. At its worst, the measles were on my tongue and made food taste horrible. Jello had no taste at all and I had quite a bit of that because it was better than eating food that tasted like shit. The good news was that I lost more than 10 pounds in the process. (Of course, I soon gained it all back.)

    I'd had mumps and chicken pox as a kid but somehow managed not to get measles.
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    I don't remember my measles episode being "bad". In fact, I was frustrated that I was not allowed to compete.
    TB was a concern when I was a child. I was prime age for polio in the 40s and I think we took some precaution but can'r remember what it was.
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    Quote Originally Posted by El Toro View Post
    Sadly, we might see a comeback of these TB tests in the next few decades as well as more frequent appearances of long preventable diseases because humans are basically dumb as dog shit(on a good day).
    We don't routinely vaccinate for for TB in the United States. If it were to make a comeback, it wouldn't have anything to do with anti-vaxers.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pego View Post
    IIRC, our generation childhood's only vaccines available were smallpox and BCG (for TB). BCG was universally administered in Europe, not so in USA. Polio became available in mid-50s, MMR 60s.
    As far as I remember, I had chicken pox, mumps, scarlet fever and probably a very mild case of pertussis. Do not recall having either measles or rubella. It is interesting, since my younger brother had measles when I was in the pre-teens.
    You probably had a mild/asymptomatic case of measles at some point and didn't realize it, it is unlikely you would have been exposed so many times and never catch it.
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    Quote Originally Posted by polevaultpower View Post
    You probably had a mild/asymptomatic case of measles at some point and didn't realize it, it is unlikely you would have been exposed so many times and never catch it.
    Yes, the chances are that this was the case .
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    I had to travel to the "Far East" (that is the "Orient" for all you old timers and "East Asia" for all you younger folk) a few years back and decided to keep it simple and visit the local CVS to get all my booster shots..

    Well, the CVS nurse pulls up a list of destinations from the CDC with the necessary vaccine shots that one should get depending on various destinations north to south in the "far east". I got poked with a needle a few times and I was on my way.

    I left quite impressed with both the CDC and CVS.
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