Facts, Not Fiction

 
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    #11
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    So, who else knows little about their family tree? I have no clue on names beyond my grandparents. Hell, I didn't even know my grandfather had 4 sisters until his funeral and they showed up. Blood definitely isn't thicker than water in my family.
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    #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pego
    Quote Originally Posted by tandfman
    Quote Originally Posted by Marlow
    I share a last name with over 800,000 other Americans, and every single one of us is related (and no, we're not all from West Virginia), because only one man has ever immigrated to America with that name.
    That seems highly improbable, doesn't it?
    I did a little calculation. 275 years equals between 18 and 19 generations (if you allow 15 years/generation). 3 surviving children per couple would amount to close to 1.5 mil heads. Since the name follows the male side, half of it is very close to those 800,000 Marlow/Tafnuts.
    Pego, there is no dispute about "too many Tafnuts", but my own genealogical records produce very different numbers than yours.

    Just following my paternal lineage, first born in North America was over 300 years ago, and there was an average age of the Father of just over 31 years old, only 10 generations, and an average number of siblings born (not all survived) of 8.5 children per Father. Wow, did I ever drag that average down!!! My first 5 forefathers in North America averaged 12 children per ---- yikes...
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    #13
    I'm not sure I can count this as genealogical, but even in small towns you can have relatives you don't know. My poor sister ended up dating some fella who turned out to be her cousin, only she had no idea at the time. My Dad was one of 7 kids and all the rest of his side of the family had huge families.

    I used to buy stationery every week from a kid in a shop in town who also turned out to be a first cousin!

    It is a fascinating subject. My brother traced the family tree and we can trace links back (we think) to the 12th century! And we have cousins who are very, very, VERY distantly related to George Washington.
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    #14
    NOBODY in my family reads this forum, so I feel free to unload a bit...

    About two years ago at a get-together in the mid-sized college town where I was living (and my brother had once gone to school), someone asked me how that older brother was doing. I said he was living on the other side of the country, had finally settled down and gotten married in his late 30s and just had his first child. From across the room someone said "No, that's not his first child..." and the story of an out-of-wedlock daughter given up for adoption nearly 20 years ago came out. No one in my family knew--not even our parents.

    Just goes to show that in a town of 30,000 people, nothing stays a secret forever.
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    #15
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    I dabbled in geneology a few years ago. Amazing, thanks other's research, what you can learn online.
    Most interesting discovery was that my mothers paternal gggggf was Chief Buie(Bowie) in Carolina in the late 1700s. Buie was Creek/Choctaw. Tribal designation gets a little iffy in that era as the Eastern tribes were displaced by Europeans and stronger tribes displaced weaker tribes westward.
    Famous frontiersman,Jim Bowie descended from that line but he is generally consided to be Choctaw. My ggggf, a Choctaw, married one of Chief Buie's daughters and the family migrated from Carolina to Alabama to MIssissippi, where my ggf and gf were born. I guess that makes Jim Bowie a veerrrry distant cousin.
    All these people had large families. Undoubtaby many made the infamous "Trail of Tears" trek but I cannot definitely identify any in my direct line; who apparently lagged behind.

    My mother's maternal grandfather was a Confederate soldier who came to Texas after the Civil War and married a Comanche woman. The Comanches did not keep as good records as the "Five Civilized Tribes" and little is known of her ancestry except she was somehow related to Quanah Parker. I suspect that virtually all Comanches in North Texas in the late 19th Century were related to Quanah Parker, who was, of course, half Caucasian, being the son of Cynthia Parker, who was kidnapped as a child and raised as Comanche..

    Bottom line, everybody is remotely related to everybody. We just don't know it.
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    #16
    JRM,
    Was Neil Cusack the bar owner?
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    #17
    Quote Originally Posted by Mighty Favog
    NOBODY in my family reads this forum, so I feel free to unload a bit...
    Perhaps not regularly, but as soon as your older brother googles Mighty Favog, you're outed! :)
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    #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pego
    I did a little calculation. 275 years equals between 18 and 19 generations (if you allow 15 years/generation). 3 surviving children per couple would amount to close to 1.5 mil heads. Since the name follows the male side, half of it is very close to those 800,000 Marlow/Tafnuts.
    I don't think the average parenting age has ever been 15. Try 25.
    Było smaszno, a jaszmije smukwijne...
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    #19
    Quote Originally Posted by lonewolf
    Bottom line, everybody is remotely related to everybody. We just don't know it.
    I get fascinated by this subject. The BBC recently had a documentary that said that all non-African people are pretty much descended from a group of about 500-700 people that first crossed from the Horn of Africa into Arabia. So you're right - we're ALL related to everyone else! Apparently the minimum number of humans needed for a viable population (genetically speaking) is about 500.

    We have a genealogical documentary series on TV here called "Who do you think you are?" which follows celebrities as they trace their ancestry. Mathew Pinsent of rowing fame managed to trace a fairly direct line back to the William the Conqueror. It's been a really popular series.

    Of course you can take it too far. We have aristocrats in this country who look down on the Royal Family as newcomers because their ancestry doesn't go as far back lol.
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    #20
    Quote Originally Posted by Powell
    I don't think the average parenting age has ever been 15. Try 25.
    You've never been to West Virginia, have you? :-)
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