Facts, Not Fiction

 
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    #31
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    Is it already time for my annual remonstration that the earth has gone through multiple multi-millennial cycles of ice ages and is still emerging from the most recent one which has been retreating for some 15,000 years ago?
    Long after we and perhaps humans are gone, earth will reverse course and become virtually uninhabitable because it is largely covered by ice.
    In the meantime, don't worry about it.. humans did not cause change, cannot prevent it and will adapt to it.
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    #32
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    "why Californians secretly love earthquakes"

    https://www.zocalopublicsquare.org/2...ng-california/
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    #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by user4 View Post

    Nevertheless I have a friend in southern california, they live on one of those steep hills that 30% of the population seems to inhabit. Ill also add that the building codes in California read like they were written by a room full of fly by night builders. Well, I fear for her when that big 8 comes.
    You are off by an order of magnitude, but don't let facts get in the way.

    Ditto, facts seem like such a distraction from your argument. The building codes in LA have changed with each major earthquake. I think that there were some changes after 1904 (although that was Northern Cal, and the biggest effect might have been on fire prevention/reduction). But the Long Beach quack in the 1930s caused a big change in building cods and building and a very large number of lives were saved by those changes. Until the 1960s there was only one building taller than about 13 stories in the LA area, the LA City Hall, which was on giant rollers. by then construction techniques had improved and the building codes allowed taller buildings given the right materials. When the 1971 (7.1 Sylmar, 62 seconds duration) quake hit my brother lived on the hills 4 miles east of downtown (right at Cal State LA) and could see the building sway downtown (several at ~60 stories) and there was not really any damage to those tall buildings [ I lived several miles further east and jsut lived through it; not sure we even lost dishes]. Buildings built before the 1930s changes fair badly in the 1971 quake, and a lot of them were torn down or modified. New codes also were enacted and in the 1990s the quake that hit LA caused a lot of damage but took very few lives. I suspect that the same earthquake at the same year in Chicago would have resulted in a large number of deaths (I do not know how many, but 100, 1000, ???). So unless you actually have something real to say, fact based, about building codes and their effects, why don't you just move on; not sure that I would expect you to apologize for your errant comments but... [By the way, you might compare the effects on the SF region and the LA region after the similar quakes in the same time period - LA restored infrastructure several times faster than SF.]
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    #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by user4 View Post
    ...
    Nevertheless I have a friend in southern california, they live on one of those steep hills that 30% of the population seems to inhabit. Ill also add that the building codes in California read like they were written by a room full of fly by night builders. Well, I fear for her when that big 8 comes.
    Actually, the building codes in CA are perhaps the best in the nation for mitigating the effects of earthquakes. Not just for high rises and homes, but for bridges as well. There are a lot of seemingly ridiculous sections of code, to be sure, but by and large, the building codes here have been updated from lessons learned after each significant earthquake.

    If I am to be in a home, building, or bridge when an 8.0 hits, I would rather be in CA than any other place.
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