Facts, Not Fiction

 
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    Quote Originally Posted by Powell View Post
    I find it hard to believe the depth of talent is less nowadays than it used to be. Tennis has become a more global sport, it's no longer limited to kids coming from privileged background and there's a lot more money available in it.
    GH's post didn't quite seem right to me but I wanted to take some time to think about it before I responded. However, you took the words right out of my mouth. Not only is the sport more accessible today than it was 40-50 years ago, but the financial incentives have increased exponentially, and the best talent always goes where the money is.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Conor Dary View Post
    Tennis a global sport? You aren't going to get into tennis unless courts are rather ubiquitous....which isn't true in much of the world....even Britain home of Wimbledon few play it....mostly because few people have access to courts....
    I said it became MORE global. Obviously it isn't at the same level as T&F, but compared to the 70s, Eastern Europe has become a major force, there are way more black players, and South America as well as Asia are making more of an impact.
    Było smaszno, a jaszmije smukwijne...
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    Quote Originally Posted by DrJay View Post
    One of my medical partners played on the women's tour a number of years ago (retired maybe 10 years ago?), was up a break on Sharapova once, lost when rain forced the match indoors onto not her favorite surface. She watches virtually no tennis anymore, busy life with three toddlers. But she when she saw a little bit of some match in the last couple of years, she said to her husband, "I'm so confused...why are these men at the baseline so much??" She noted the men's game has changed from serve-and-volley, points lasting five shots, to baseline play with all those 10 to 20+ shot points we saw Sunday.
    The modern racket technology has helped returners more than servers. Nadal, Djokovic and Murray have all won higher percentages of their return games than Agassi, who was considered the best returner of his generation.

    https://www.atptour.com/en/stats/lea...ormerNo1=false

    On the other hand, the biggest servers of the game, like Karlovic, Isner and Raonic have not won anything of significance.
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    If Federer played in an era of less depth, then his contemporary should have also benefited from the depleted field. Here are four players who ranked #1 before Federer.

    Marat Safin. (18 months older than Federer. Two Grand Slam titles. Seven semifinals in total.)
    Lleyton Hewitt. (6 months older than Federer. Two Grand Slam titles. Seven semifinals in total.)
    Juan Carlos Ferrero. (18 Months older than Federer. One Grand Slam title. Six semifinals in total.)
    Andy Roddick. (12 months younger than Federer. One Grand Slam title. Ten semifinals in total.)

    All of them lost many early round matches during their prime. Federer made 23 straight semifinals from 2004 Wimbledon to 2010 Australian Open.

    I look at the contemporary of Nadal and Djokivic later. But aside from Murray, no one seems to have consistent record.
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    Quote Originally Posted by TN1965 View Post
    All of them lost many early round matches during their prime. Federer made 23 straight semifinals from 2004 Wimbledon to 2010 Australian Open.
    And I think that's the key to the success of the Big Three. They just took the game to a level of consistency never seen before.
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    On post #5 of this thread back in 2008, someone quoted McEnroe picking Federer as the GOAT, who unlike Sampras, did win a French title.
    Last edited by jazzcyclist; 09-10-2019 at 11:44 PM.
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    Though I have to put him no higher than #4 or #5 (the current 3 and Laver), my favorite quote on Pete Sampras came from his arch-rival, Andre Agassi. Asked who were the top 5 players he ever faced, Agassi said, "Sampras, Sampras, Sampras, Sampras, and Sampras"
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    Quote Originally Posted by jazzcyclist View Post
    I did too but then they showed the stat that Nadal was 208-1 when winning first two sets and the other guy was 0-4 when losing the first two sets. I don't know who the GOAT is in men's tennis but IMO, he's definitely an active player, not a retired player. As for Serena, it's amazing that she can still play at such a high level at her age when you consider how long her contemporaries (eg. Clijsters, Henin, Hingis) have been out of the game.
    Clijsters (36 and 7 years retired) is about to rejoin the fray, seeing how Club Fed (38-39 next season) and the sisters (Serena 38 next season; Venus 39-40 next season) are still in business.
    Last edited by CookyMonzta; 09-12-2019 at 08:02 PM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by CookyMonzta View Post
    Clijsters (36 and 7 years retired) is about to rejoin the fray, seeing how Club Fed (38-39 next season) and the sisters (Serena 38 next season; Venus 39-40 next season) are still in business.
    I like it. Do you remember how she embarrassed Serena the last time she returned from maternity leave?
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    Quote Originally Posted by jazzcyclist View Post
    I like it. Do you remember how she embarrassed Serena the last time she returned from maternity leave?
    And then Serena went on a rampage, to the tune of 10 of the next 24 majors.

    Clijsters almost always had her way at the U.S. Open (3 titles). We'll see if she can get her mojo back after 7 years away from the game.

    If Serena somehow breaks out of her finals slump and wins one, and her mojo doesn't really start to crack, she will be hard to beat (at least, for Clijsters).

    Venus undoubtedly has been on a downturn since her 2017 season (her best this entire decade, quite probably motivated by Serena's absence); but then again, the few years before 2017 weren't that great, either. If somehow she summons her 2017 mojo again, and luck somehow clears the way for her to sail through one of these tournaments (and to be quite honest, I didn't think she'd get past Konta in the 2017 Wimbledon semis), she might have a chance to do something no one thought possible...

    ...And then it'll be Roger's turn the following year.
    Last edited by CookyMonzta; 09-12-2019 at 10:45 PM.
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