Facts, Not Fiction

 
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    Re: Dave Barry Says Newspapers Are Dead
    #31
    [quote=bad hammy]
    Quote Originally Posted by tandfman
    Quote Originally Posted by "bad hammy":1ekeerll
    Im with you, Helen, and I am sure that many\most of here are too. But it is only a matter of time before most ink-on-paper becomes a thing of the past. Not in my lifetime too many old farts like me will pay good money for this stuff. But within a couple of generations . . .
    I disagree. No doubt, there will be continued shrinkage in the industry, and the newpapers of the next century will look as different from today's as today's look when compared with those of 100 years ago. But I think the medium will not die so easily.
    I'll check back with you then . . . :wink:[/quote:1ekeerll]
    Times change. Recently cut my ties to the local rag after 50+ years and don't miss it a bit. On the other hand, after a few years off I'm back in the T&FN fold . . .
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    Re: Dave Barry Says Newspapers Are Dead
    #32
    I've always subscribed to magazines.

    Pro Wrestling Illustrated
    Track & Field News
    Blues Revue
    ESPN the Magazine
    Sports Illustrated
    Beckett

    These were to be read with me in bed with a nightlight on. When I could zero in on them. How cool is it to go to the mailbox and find one of those pet intertests? That cannot be duplicated by a computer. It's simply not the same.

    Then there's the looking back over the years, the collection.
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    Re: Dave Barry Says Newspapers Are Dead
    #33
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    I will not be surprised if local print newspapers die within my lifetime. I guess I am completely old school (though maybe young for this board that trends "ancient") but I do not consider the experience of viewing a newspaper website the equal of a piece of paper in my hand in any way. If and when all my local newspapers die I will miss them at least a little bit.
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    Re: Dave Barry Says Newspapers Are Dead
    #34
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    As with most things, I have no idea, but my experience has some similarities and differences with what's been posted above. There are so many points of access for national and international news, news analysis, and related reporting (e.g., on the arts/entertainment, sports, other cultural things etc), that over the past few years I cancelled all of my print subscriptions to newspapers, news magazines, etc. I do have some online subscriptions (e.g., NY Times) for greater content access. The only print publication I still receive is TFN.

    However, at the local level, it's different -- I live in a small town (but big enough to support a daily print newspaper) -- it's a rural county seat, and in this setting the local newspaper is the source of news. They have been careful not to compete too much with themselves (e.g., print v. online) with their own Web presence. So, I still subscribe to the print edition of the local paper. Most days I page through it in five minutes or less, but it really is the only source of local news. I don't see them going out of business any time soon. It's a different model at this level -- I'm sure they have their problems, and I'm sure no one is getting rich, but they don't have any competition either. No local TV station, and anything beyond the local -- the regional newspapers and TV stations in larger cities -- have no reporting on this town at all. The digital transition, information superhighway (or trash dump, as it often seems), or whatever we call it, doesn't really seem to apply out here, at least regarding the local.
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    #35
    What prompted me to revive this thread (and the other one I just updated) was my reading today's New York Times over breakfast. It showed dramatically a point that I think has been made on other threads--those newspapers that have thus far survived have dramatically cut their content and their editorial staff. Papers are much thinner than they used to be (and that's not just due to fewer pages of ads). And they've seriously reduced their editorial staffs. (Google Newspaper staff reduction and you'll see pages of related stories.)

    In any event, getting back to the NY Times, the Yankees played their arch-rivals, the Red Sox, this weekend in Boston, and the Mets played at home against the Phillies. The NY Times did not staff those games--they printed Associated Press stories instead. Incredible!

    And of course there was no mention at all of the 5th Avenue Mile. No story, no agate results. The event is a big deal locally and was televised locally and nationally as well.

    :-(
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    #36
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    I haven't seen any newspaper mentioning the 5th Avenue Mile....not even the RG....I think the novelty had been worn out.

    The Times wisely is focusing on political, national and world news. Which is better than ever....
    Last edited by Conor Dary; 09-09-2019 at 08:07 PM.
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