Facts, Not Fiction

 
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    #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by tandfman
    Quote Originally Posted by tafnut
    I teach 80 bright young minds. I did a survey at the beginning of the year, and FOUR (4!) regularly read the paper.
    That's very depressing. I didn't think it was quite that bad. Just curious--do they think they're getting from other sources what they would get from reading the newspaper every day, or is it rather that they place little or no value on getting those things at all.

    Quote Originally Posted by tafnut
    I have been reading at least two papers a day (weekdays) since I was 11.
    But when you were 11, there weren't a helluva lot of alternative information sources, and there certainly wasn't the Internet.
    They seem reasonably well-informed. I'd guess from their conversations that it's pretty evenly split among TV, internet and talking with parents/peers. On the other hand, I used the phrase, "can't see the forest for the trees," and not one student in a section of 16 had ever heard it before. There are SO inundated with info on a daily basis, I think thet're learning to tune out much of what they're exposed to and not actively seeking out MORE info.
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    #22
    Quote Originally Posted by tafnut
    They seem reasonably well-informed. I'd guess from their conversations that it's pretty evenly split among TV, internet and talking with parents/peers. . . . . There are SO inundated with info on a daily basis, I think thet're learning to tune out much of what they're exposed to and not actively seeking out MORE info.
    One of my concerns is the quality of what they're being inundated with. Believe me, I am not saying that everything that appears in a newspaper is true or that nothing that appears on tv or the Internet is true. But it seems to me that reading a good newspaper every day is a better way to acquire useful information about a wide range of subjects than watching tv or surfing the web. I'm also concerned that if they have not acquired the newpaper reading habit by the time they're out of high school, they'll never acquire it.
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    #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by tandfman
    One of my concerns is the quality of what they're being inundated with. Believe me, I am not saying that everything that appears in a newspaper is true or that nothing that appears on tv or the Internet is true. But it seems to me that reading a good newspaper every day is a better way to acquire useful information about a wide range of subjects than watching tv or surfing the web. I'm also concerned that if they have not acquired the newpaper reading habit by the time they're out of high school, they'll never acquire it.
    My biggest fear stems from a Time magazine article last year that predicted that people would be soon getting their news primarily from custom-made news filters on-line. The problem is that one has to specify what one's interests are, so that the web-worms would gather only that info you are actually interested in. Well, that eliminates 99% of all the interesting stuff that goes on in the world. By reading a newspaper, I am forced to consider all sorts of diverse news items, some of which I'll read, even though I would not have even known I was interested in it, until I had read some of it. In the future we may know more and more about less and less. I'd much rather be a polymath than a 2-dimensional wonk on a few things (except T&F, of course!!)
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    #24
    Yup!
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    #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by tafnut
    Quote Originally Posted by tandfman
    Quote Originally Posted by tafnut
    I teach 80 bright young minds. I did a survey at the beginning of the year, and FOUR (4!) regularly read the paper.
    That's very depressing. I didn't think it was quite that bad. Just curious--do they think they're getting from other sources what they would get from reading the newspaper every day, or is it rather that they place little or no value on getting those things at all.

    Quote Originally Posted by tafnut
    I have been reading at least two papers a day (weekdays) since I was 11.
    But when you were 11, there weren't a helluva lot of alternative information sources, and there certainly wasn't the Internet.
    They seem reasonably well-informed. I'd guess from their conversations that it's pretty evenly split among TV, internet and talking with parents/peers. On the other hand, I used the phrase, "can't see the forest for the trees," and not one student in a section of 16 had ever heard it before. There are SO inundated with info on a daily basis, I think thet're learning to tune out much of what they're exposed to and not actively seeking out MORE info.
    We live in "Info Culture" not "Wisdom Culture." There's a vast difference between the two. As tafnut & tandfman state above, the benefit of reading an actual newspaper (at least a good one) is that we are presented with information and ideas that we might not otherwise have considered.

    The net "news" culture is aiming more and more at simply providing each "consumer" with precisely (and only) the facts that confirm their existing beliefs. This is not a recipe for intellectual growth.
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    #26
    Quote Originally Posted by tafnut
    My biggest fear stems from a Time magazine article last year that predicted that people would be soon getting their news primarily from custom-made news filters on-line.
    This already happens in science. Gone are the days of flicking through the paper journals in the library. It definitely narrows ones perspective.
    Knowledge is to know the extent of one's ignorance
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    #27
    As a teen, I read from 4-7 newspapers on a daily basis, ranging from the loony right to the loony left of the spectrum. I learned more from those newspapers than I ever did in any classroom.

    The rarity of newspaper readership among youth is what leads me to believe they are intelligent, but uneducated.
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    #28
    Quote Originally Posted by gm
    The rarity of newspaper readership among youth is what leads me to believe they are intelligent, but uneducated.
    And unfortunately, they don't realize that and, in many cases, neither do their parents and teachers.
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    #29
    I love reading the print version of the paper. Nothing ticks me off more than when the delivery is late and I'm forced to spend my morning breakfast time in front of a computer screen. Newspapers will not disappear. They may continue to lose readership for a period of time, but those of us who care for more than the lack of in depth coverage on TV, are enough of a market for them to continue to exist.

    www.stephenpaske.com
    Stephen Paske
    www.stephenpaske.com
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    #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by tandfman
    Quote Originally Posted by gm
    The rarity of newspaper readership among youth is what leads me to believe they are intelligent, but uneducated.
    And unfortunately, they don't realize that and, in many cases, neither do their parents and teachers.
    I'm not sure I can put my finger on what exactly IS missing, but trust me when I say today's kids are MORE educated, more sophisticated, more worldly, more 'advanced' than ANY previous generation (and the next will be more than this one) BUT . . . something HAS been lost. Perhaps it is that they have less depth and more breadth. I trust my future in their hands, but the future WILL be different, as it must be.
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