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    Geriatric Query: Old enough to remember your family's first TV?
    #1
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    In the very early 1950's my old man bought an Emerson TV in a huge wooden cabinet. In fact it had a very small picture tube angled to somehow projected to a fold-up translucent screen atop the cabinet to create a larger, albeit fuzzier, image.

    We set it up in the corner of our large living room and rearranged the sofa, easy chairs and dining room chairs into rows like a home theater.

    For a while friends and family would show up every night to view whatever bizarre stuff was on the 3 or 4 LA stations. That lasted until everyone grew impatient with deciding what to watch and bought their own TVs.

    When I had my own druthers @ viewing I became addicted to Superman (George Reeves) and endless re-runs of old Laurel & Hardy short films.
    Me, I never have gotten tired of watching Stan and Ollie move that fracking piano up all those stairs in Culver City.
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    #2
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    This is one of my most distinct early childhood memories. When I was 4, I had my own little bedroom, which for some (never unexplained to me) reason was also the TV room. We had a little Philco model. I only remember two shows. Kukla, Fran and Ollie, and Mama, which was a weekly CBS series that ran from 1949 to 1957. It was based on the book Mama's Bank Account, which was also adapted into a film I Remember Mama (1948). Mama was at night, so my parents and sister would sit in the dark in my room to watch it, as I was already in bed. We moved out of that house before I turned 5.
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    #3
    I'm pretty sure my TV watching in the late 50's early 60's was on my family's first TV although it would have been a number of years old at the time.
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    #4
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    I too well remember our first set...about a 12 incher. But what I remember the most was my parents stuck it in our unfinished basement, and we watched on folding deck chairs. Surely, they did not want to ruin our living room or den with such a monstrosity !
    But at last, I could watch Howdy Doody on our own TV instead of mooching on neighbors.
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    #5
    Quote Originally Posted by jc203 View Post
    I never have gotten tired of watching Stan and Ollie move that fracking piano up all those stairs in Culver City.
    I believe those stairs are in Silver Lake.

    https://www.google.com/maps/place/34...8.275139?hl=en

    http://www.latimes.com/health/la-he-...htmlstory.html

    I'm a bit too young for 1950's television memories. Mine probably start in 1964 with the Beatles on Ed Sullivan (and I probably only remember that because my dad plugged in his Wollensak and recorded the audio).
    Last edited by wamego relays champ; 09-21-2016 at 03:00 AM.
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    #6
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    I was a child pre-TV but I was aware there was a TV demonstration at the Chicago World Fair in 1939. The pictures I saw looked to me like my grandparents floor standing Philco in a walnut cabinet with a large dial, several knobs and short wave bands. I used to fiddle with it for hours but never got a picture.
    The first actual TV I remember seeing was in lounge in the Student Union at Oklahoma A&M in 1949. It was probably a 13" B&W mounted high on the wall somehow and drew large crowds every night.
    The first TV I owned was a 1955 13" Philco B&W table model with rabbit ears. My kids took it over in their play room when we upgraded in the living room. When my oldest daughter started college circa 1970, she painted it orange and black and took it to Oklahoma State University (nee Okla A&M). Fifty years later, she still has it and although not in daily use, it still works.
    They don't make em like they used to.
    Last edited by lonewolf; 09-21-2016 at 03:28 AM.
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    #7
    Abuelos were early adopters: Philo, RCA or Emerson, round screen. Farmer Grey, Krazy Katz, later Howdy Doogie, Magic Cottage etc all. FM too!
    I would be outilized HJ as soon inters watched all that while complaining that I nagged them to come out and jump. They became cheerleaders and majorettes, one head Monday @ U of Vermont. They could well have run track...if.
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    #8
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    We moved to Santa Monica (and then quickly to South Pasadena) just before I was born in 1950 and our 'aunt Edith' (not actually an aunt) lived in Culver City. When I was about six I think that she died and we inherited that TV, which we had when I left home (but supplemented by another TV given to our family (i.e., we never bought a TV). I continued that trend for another twenty years, buying my first TV to watch the Seoul Olympics (and buying my first computer a few months later to finally finish writing up my PhD).

    I remember telling my son that we did not get a TV until I was six; a bit later I realized that he imagined it as the current TVs with a gazillion channels, large screen, color, etc. I had to tell him that we were very lucky to live in southern California at the base of the mountains near Pasadena so that the transmission towers were 5000 feet above us and so we had the most channels of just about anyone anywhere 2, 3, 5, 7, 9, 11, and 13 all with pretty good reception, but only in black in white, no remote, and cartoons were only shown on Saturday mornings.
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    #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jackaloupe View Post
    I would be outilized HJ as soon inters watched all that while complaining that I nagged them to come out and jump.
    English please!
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    #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by 26mi235 View Post
    we had the most channels of just about anyone anywhere 2, 3, 5, 7, 9, 11, and 13 all with pretty good reception, but only in black in white, no remote, and cartoons were only shown on Saturday mornings.
    Meanwhile, I lived in Purgatory: mid-state Connecticut, where the tres cool NYC stations came in as blizzards of static. My favorite show, Superman, would fade in and out with the atmospheric conditions, teasing me with bits and snatches of the program.
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